Amelia Mansie, from Bristol, had long hair before the second Covi lock last summer

An eight-year-old girl has become paralyzed after a bout of epilepsy and abnormal schooling.

Amelia Mansie, who lives in Bristol, suffered a concussion last April and began tearing her eyelids last April.

Her mother, Jema, said she could not see her friends and family, and she made progress by pulling out the hair on her head.

After struggling to make an appointment with her doctor, Amelia was finally diagnosed with trichomoniasis over the phone.

But despite the investigation and the return of the schools, the young man could not shake the habit.

Trichotillomania is thought to affect one in 50 people at various stages, with people developing strong hair loss. It is similar to OCD and is often triggered by stress, anxiety or trauma.

Amelia now has only a short hair on her back and will not leave her home without a bandage or wig.

“It was very emotional to see her mother do this,” said Monsie.

I know she is still beautiful and amazing without thinking, but I feel very sorry for her when I wash my head.

Her mother added that since returning to school earlier this year, Amilia has targeted hairdressers for her hair loss and has struggled to access children’s mental health services due to her later accumulation during the VV crisis.

But by the time she was eight years old (shown in August), she continued to pull out the hair on her head until she was bald and only a few strands of hair remained on her back.

Amelia Mansie, from Bristol, had long hair before the second Covy lock (left) last winter, but during the first lock she pulled out her eyelids until she shaved her head and left the hair on her head. Only a few long hairs on the back of the head (shown on the right, August)

Amelia (pictured this month) pulled “almost all of her hair off her head” and was diagnosed with trichomoniasis, a condition often associated with stress.

Amelia (pictured this month) pulled “almost all of her hair off her head” and was diagnosed with trichomoniasis, a condition often associated with stress.

Amelia's mother, Jema, seems to have lost the habit of pulling her hair out of sight when she was not seen, but now she says:

Amelia’s mother, Jema, seems to have lost the habit of pulling her hair when her son was not seen, but now she says, “She doesn’t have the confidence to leave home without a bandage or wig.”

According to Ms. Mansie, Amelia's biggest concern is what people think of her and whether she is a bully.

According to Ms. Mansie, Amelia’s biggest concern is what people think of her and whether she is a bully.

NHS says the condition is more common in teenage girls and young women and may feel addictive.

The first signs of Amelia’s condition were pulling her eyelids out of the first lock last month, which she believed was caused by coronavirus restrictions.

Mrs. Mansie said. She was in the middle of everything that was going on with her school because no one was ready because of the emergency lock.

If she is not a teacher, she will not be able to see her friends and family at home. It was just a big change for her. ‘

What is trichomoniasis?

Trichomoniasis is a stress disorder that causes victims to be repetitive and carelessly pull their hair out.

Patients often experience intense stress and a strong desire to be attracted, followed by joy or relief.

It can be caused by stress or anxiety, such as a stressful mental disorder or hormonal changes during adolescence.

It is most common in women between the ages of nine and 13.

Treatment focuses on the individual’s motivations and how to overcome them. One in 50 people (0.5 to 2 percent of the population) suffers from trichotillomania at various stages.

When Amelia began to remove some of her eyelids, her mother said that she ‘tried not to think,’ but her daughters eventually had no eyelids left.

And Amelia’s habit continued to improve, and she began to pull the hair out of her head during the winter lock.

She had bald patches on her back, which she did not care about at first.

But the condition of the eight-year-old was so bad that she has since “pulled out almost all of her hair on her head,” she said.

And when she first seems to be backtracking on her hair-pulling habits, Amelia says:

He added: “She knows Amelia is doing it, but she doesn’t like to talk about it.

I try to distract her from doing it, and I have learned that when I do, I stop and do not push too hard.

It was very emotional to see her mother doing this.

I know she is still beautiful and amazing without thinking, but I feel very sorry for her when I wash my head.

She is a happy, lovable and intelligent little girl, but she has changed her personality.

She had no social interest before socializing and being friends with anyone.

And she came back from school and the big girls were talking horrible things about her hair.

Amelia appears in the picture before she starts pulling her hair out during the winter lock

About 50 (0.5 to 2%) people suffer from hair loss, which usually involves hair removal on the scalp, eyebrows, or eyelids.

Amelia appears in the picture before she pulls out her hair. About 50 (0.5 to 2%) people suffer from hair loss, which usually involves hair removal on the scalp, eyebrows, or eyelids.

Amelia's mother is a

Amelia’s mother says, ‘She’s a happy, loving, and intelligent little girl,’ but that has changed her personality. “Before socializing and being friends with anyone, she had no social interests and she isolated herself,” she said.

Mrs. Mansie said - it was very emotional to see her mother do this.  I know she is still beautiful and amazing no matter what, but when I wash my head I feel very sad for her.

“It was very emotional to see her mother do this,” said Monsie. I know she is still beautiful and amazing no matter what, but when I wash my head I feel very sad for her.

Her biggest concern is what people think of her and what makes her more motivated if she is a bully.

Trying to help her is also stressful.

After examining her situation, Amelia found that she was suffering from trichomoniasis.

Mrs. Mansie turned to her son’s doctor, who confirmed that her son was suffering from the condition, but said, ‘After the summer holidays, she will return to school.’

Her mother said she could be referred to Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAHMS), but “it is very difficult to see children because there is such a background.”

Fearing that Amelia’s condition could worsen, she arranged weekly sessions for her daughter with a school therapist. And her family is paying for private hypnotherapy sessions.

Amelia is also using dolls – one of the recommended ways to deal with hair loss.

“I know this could be the case with her for the rest of her life, but I have to do what I can to help her,” she said.

There is little support for the case and although many people suffer, little is known about it.

When she was locked up, her school was as helpful and supportive as they could be and now she is back in school.

What makes it difficult is the lack of knowledge and understanding of trichotillomania.

“My priority is to help Amelia regain her self-confidence and accept her identity.” She is beautiful. ‘

.