Genevav Vilamora, 44, says she has experienced hair loss after recovering from COVID-19: After bathing, her hands are covered with hair. WASHINGTON, D.C. (AP) – A restaurant chef said: After recovering from her coma, her hair loss began to decrease for four months.

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Genevav Vilamora, 44, says she has experienced hair loss after recovering from COVID-19: After bathing, her hands are covered with hair. WASHINGTON, D.C. (AP) – A restaurant chef said: After recovering from her coma, her hair loss began to decrease for four months.

Ben de la Cruz / NPR

Each week during the Coronavirus crisis, we answer “frequently asked questions” about life. If you have any questions you would like us to consider for a future post, email us goatandsoda@npr.org Along with the topic line: “Weekly Coronavirus Questions”.

I was 19 months ago. My hair is falling out now! what is going on?

Don’t panic at first! Hair loss may seem daunting, but it is actually a common reaction to severe stress, physical (ie, disease such as COVID-19) and emotional (ie, living in epilepsy).

Given the number of us who have experienced physical and emotional stress with COVID, it is not surprising that the number of people who have experienced hair loss has increased dramatically, according to The New York Times, or a recent study in Lancett, China. You did.

In fact, this type of stress-related hair loss, commonly known as telogen influenza, can occur more often than we think, says Dr. Aurora Pop-Vicas, an infectious disease specialist at UW Health in Madison, Wisconsin. Most of us know a lot about COVID-19 and its symptoms because we can understand it now. She says that a person who has been in bed for four or five days with the flu and then noticed a fall of hair after three months will never be able to make contact between a disease and a closed discharge.

“I think this is coming more and more to us,” she says.

But why does our body often stop a traumatic event with such insults?

Dr. Greg Vanichcakorn, medical director of the COVID Activities Rehabilitation Program at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

“Basically, when a person is exposed to a serious insult, such as an infection or a very serious event, it can cause hair cells to fall asleep,” he said. “They are basically dead. And this can happen months after the insult. So it is possible that patients are still confused about why they are experiencing covandalism.

Hair also goes through this cycle as normal, says Dr. David Kotler, a family physician at the Providence St. John Health Center in Santa Monica, California.

It is a natural phenomenon that “all hair follicles pass through rest and growth and hair falls out”.

The difference between people with telogen influenza is that they all occur at the same time. Under normal circumstances, 10% of your hair is at rest, 5% is shedding and the rest is growing, Pop-Vicus said. “But when your body is in a state of extreme stress, the body prioritizes energy into action,” she explains. “Hair growth is not necessarily a function of survival. So maybe 50% of your hair will move to the restroom. That stage usually lasts two to three months, and then flows naturally.”

When those patients see the swelling on their brushes, she says – more often than not.

That delayed response makes it difficult to determine if the event is related to COVID long-range readings. Although not the first signs or complaints of long-distance passengers, Van has seen cases in patients.

And there are other causes for hair loss: Medications such as chemotherapy and aging are well-known causes, but sometimes thyroid disease, hormonal imbalances or skin problems can be the cause of the problem, says Pop-Vicus. Contacting your primary care provider will help identify that.

If you still notice bumps after six months, or if you have other symptoms such as itching, redness, tremors, or pain, these are other signs that may cause hair loss. Find a board-certified dermatologist at Dr. Cleveland Catherine at Cleveland Clinic.

Whatever the reason, sudden hair loss can be “very disturbing,” says Van.

The good news? Your hair will grow back! Without intervention, the telogen influenza usually resolves within six months, caterpillar.

In the meantime, techniques for controlling anxiety can help, such as pop-vikus-yoga and meditation, especially when combined with good nutrition, sleep and exercise.

And people who experience this symptom are advised not to underestimate family members and friends. “My hair loss was tragic because after she washed her body, her hands were covered with hair,” says 44-year-old Geneva Villamora restaurant in Washington, DC. – And that hair comes out in a day. It was only after giving birth that she regained her hair. Four months after her recovery from hair loss, her hair loss began to decline.

Sheila Mulroney Aldred is a freelance journalist in Minneapolis. She has written about COVID-19 for several publications: MedSpeck, Kaiser Health News, Science News for Students, and Washington Post. More on sheilaeldred.pressfolios.com. @Milepostmedia on Twitter