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At first, there were only a few bald spots on her head, but at the age of 10, Marcy Gallan lost 90 percent of her hair.

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At the age of 19, alopecia areata caused no hair loss anywhere in the body, a condition in which the immune system mistakenly attacks hair follicles.

“People thought I had cancer or that I was very worried. This is of great concern to me because many people have a misconception that alopecia is caused by stress.

As she grew older, she endured many forms of bullying, including not only many treatments but also painful injections, including steroid injections and other invasive treatments.

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Out of necessity, galant, now 20, She decided to become an ambassador for the disease. She now discusses youth and seniors on a number of social media platforms, raising awareness about alopecia.

Alzheimer’s is a common but unpredictable autoimmune disease. Most people lose only a few pieces of hair, while others, like Galan, lose it completely. There is no way to predict when hair loss will occur, how much and how often it will grow again.

“The only thing we know about alopecia is that you were born with a gene and you can live with that gene for the rest of your life,” says Gallant.

It was difficult for a young girl to cope with her beauty.

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Before she decided to take matters into her own hands, she was patient with name-calling and ridicule.

“Children are cruel,” said Galan. “It really ruined my self-esteem. I did not want to go to school. I left home crying every morning. ”

She then plans to confront the attacks with information.

After her first presentation of PowerPoint to Alopecia in her 6th grade – instead of symbols – there were many “tears and apologies.”

“I took off my wig and showed them my head,” she said.

After Galent changed schools in 7th grade, Wigwo “continued to be harassed because it was“ unnatural. ” She talked about the disease in several classrooms and at all school meetings for children in grades 7-12.

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“Standing in front of more than 600 people was the worst thing of my life,” she said.

But it worked.

“After that, I had no problems. It gives me more confidence, knowing that people will understand my situation rather than jump to conclusions. ”

Each year she talks to new students at the school to “raise awareness for alopecia to prevent future comments or confusion.”

But Galant continued to try new treatment options.

While undergoing “severe chemotherapy,” some of her hair has grown back, but she later decides that the side effects are worthless.

Eventually, she decided to stop all treatment.

At first, she was “relaxed” by wearing different wigs every day, and finally she felt confident going to school bald.

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“Baldness is not a sign of weakness. It is a sign of strength. ”

About a year ago, Galata began doing wig reviews and advising others on her Instagram page called Alopecia Art.

She has also been active on other social media, including creating her own YouTube channel.

“I realized that I could help others,” she says. “It was great to have opportunities. . . To normalize baldness and raise awareness.

And in the past, because of her condition, it was sometimes difficult to meet, and today she is “happy” with the person she met in 10th grade.

“He’s not worried,” she said. I guess he took the right person.

Galant says she is studying in King to become a pediatrician in a field where she looks forward to helping children during her hospital trip.

hrivers@postmedia.com

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